14D Hong Kong to Shanghai

0
Silver Spirit
From$6,930
Silver Spirit
From$6,930
Full Name*
Email Address*
Your Enquiry*
* I agree with Terms of Service and Privacy Statement.
Please agree to all the terms and conditions before proceeding to the next step
Save To Wish List

Adding item to wishlist requires an account

146
14D
Availability : 9 Feb'21
Hong Kong
Shanghai
Tour Details

Modern yet mystic, peaceful yet chaotic, Taiwan, Japan and China are lands of contradiction. Join us as we contemplate the solemn history of Hiroshima, enjoy the Love River in Kaohsiung the birthplace of martial arts in Naha, and bathe in the hot springs of Beppu. For total immersion in the shimmering modernity of urban Japan, overnight in Osaka, before culminating your trip in Shanghai’s mystery, history and promise.

7 Day cruise options available – find out more.

Price in USD Includes

  • Spacious suites – over 80% with private verandas
  • Butler service in every suite
  • Unlimited Free Wifi
  • Personalised service – nearly one crew member for every guest
  • Multiple restaurants, diverse cuisine, open-seating dining
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship, including champagne, select wines and spirits
  • 24-hour dining service
  • Onboard entertainment
  • Complimentary transportation into town in most ports
  • Onboard gratuities
Itinerary

Tue, 9 FebHong Kong, China

A spectacular, serrated skyline of soaring towers and neon lights, Hong Kong is a vibrant, immersive metropolis and cultural hub. Dramatic harbour-front light shows transform the waterfront’s gleaming buildings into a colourful canvas – best seen from the Star Ferry, when the Symphony of Lights blares into life each evening. A city where future and tradition collides – perhaps best illustrated by the skyscrapers that feature gaping holes, designed to allow spirit dragons to soar from the hills to the waterfront unimpeded. Wander flowing shopping streets, wade through sprawling markets and soak up the neon glory of this one-of-a-kind city – which continues to reach for the sky. Hong Kong’s dense jumble of activity is one of its main appeals, but once you’ve felt the thrill of rising to towering observation decks, to see the soaring city from above, it’s surprisingly easy to find peace among Hong Kong’s intense urban wonders. Victoria Peak is the highest point and it offers staggering views down over the city and harbour. The Peak Tram funicular can ferry you to the top, to the vantage point which was historically adored by the rich for the cooler air found here, away from the busy bustle of the city streets. Many elaborate temples add a tranquil element to Hong Kong’s whirr, and Tin Hau temple has a surprisingly urban location, considering its dedication to the Goddess of the Sea. It did once occupy the shorefront, but the city’s growth saw land reclaimed from the sea around it, leaving the temple marooned inland. Having been leased to the British for 99 years, milky tea is a revered tradition here – enjoy your cup with a serving of local dim sum.While it’s easy to think all the bright lights are the sum of today’s Hong Kong, you need only walk or board a tram for the short jaunt west into Western to discover a side of Hong Kong that is more traditionally Chinese but no less high-energy. You’ll discover the real Hong Kong to the east of Central, too, in Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and beyond. Amid the residential towers are restaurants, shopping malls, bars, convention centers, a nice smattering of museums, and—depending on fate and the horse you wager on—one of Hong Kong’s luckiest or unluckiest spots, the Happy Valley Racecourse. Kowloon sprawls across a generous swath of the Chinese mainland across Victoria Harbour from Central. Tsim Sha Tsui, at the tip of Kowloon peninsula, is packed with glitzy shops, first-rate museums, and eye-popping views of the skyline across the water. Just to the north are the teeming market streets of Mong Kok and in the dense residential neighborhoods beyond, two of Hong Kong’s most enchanting spiritual sights, Wong Tai Sin Temple and Chi Lin Nunnery. As you navigate this huge metropolis (easy to do on the excellent transportation network), keep in mind that streets are usually numbered odd on one side, even on the other. There’s no baseline for street numbers and no block-based numbering system, but street signs indicate building numbers for any given block.

Wed, 10 FebDay at Sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Thu, 11 FebIshigaki Ryukyu Islands, Japan

Ishigaki is a city in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, and includes Ishigaki Island and the disputed Senkaku Islands territory. Ishigaki City is the political, cultural, and economic centre of the Yaeyama Islands. At approximately 85 square miles (221 square kilometres) Ishigaki City covers all of Ishigaki Island. Ishigaki Island is part of the island chain comprising the Yaeyama Archipelago, and surrounded by coral reefs. Its highest point is Omoto, an approximately 1,726-foot-high (about 526-metre-high) mountain located on Ishigaki Island, and the tallest mountain in the Okinawa Prefecture. Together with Kabira Bay, Mount Omoto is a nationally-designated Place of Scenic Beauty. The uninhabited Senkaku Islands are located approximately 93 miles (about 150 kilometres) north of Ishigaki Island, and have an area of approximately 2.4 square miles (about 6.3 square kilometres).

Fri, 12 FebNaha Okinawa, Japan

Unlike other parts of Japan, Okinawa has its own separate history, having been the independent kingdom of Ryukyu during the 15th century. It is located in an ideal area between mainland Japan and Taiwan; the small kingdom prospered and traded goods with Japan, China, Korea, and Southeast Asia. Subsequently, Okinawa developed its own unique history and culture that is evident today. Naha, the largest city in Okinawa Prefecture, has nearly 6 million visitors from outside of Okinawa prefecture every year, and it has been one of the most popular destinations within Japan. What makes this city so special? You are sure to be fascinated by magnificent Okinawa landscapes while you are in the city. Remaining of the kingdom of Ryukyu is a “must-see” but you will also learn the history of Okinawa during World War II as well. Okinawa prefecture was under American occupation since 1945, and it finally returned to Japanese sovereignty in 1972. You could still see the combination of Japanese and American cultures.

Sat, 13 FebNaze, Amani Oshima, Japan

4 Excursions:
– Canoeing in the Mangrove
– Highlight of Amami Oshima
– Kimono, Silk & Tanaka Isson Museum
– Nature of Amami Oshima

Sun, 14 FebKagoshima (Kyushu Island), Japan

One of Japan’s most southerly major cities, Kagoshima is dominated by the imposing Sakurajima volcano’s cone – a legendary active volcano that broods, churns and puffs out ash nearby. A pretty old-time ferry chugs across the still waters to the gently sloping foothills of the volcano’s cone, and it’s easy to imagine where the comparisons with its sister city Naples materialised, as you sail the glorious sweeping Kinko Bay, below beaming sunshine, towards the immense volcanic spectacle. This is certainly no historic relic, and the volcano remains revered and feared, with the most dramatic recent eruption taking place in 1914, and spewing out a new bridge of land into the sea. Make the most of the geothermal activity in the area by indulging in a stress-simmering black sand bath. Incredibly relaxing, you’ll be submerged in the warm sand, as you feel your muscles relaxing in the heat, and rejuvenating blood pumping around your body. Enjoy a privileged view of the iconic volcano’s loom from the terraced garden of Senganen Garden. Built in 1658, this elegant, traditional garden has belonged to the Shimadzu family for 350 years. Wander the gardens – which bloom with Japan’s renowned cherry tree blossoms and feature tiny bridges looping over ponds and rock pools – before sitting back and sipping a wholesome green matcha latte. Elsewhere, museums offer Feudal Era and Satsuma Province history, as well as insights into the Kamikaze squadrons of World War II. Lake Ikeda is also close by, so be sure to keep an eye out for the legendary Issie monster.

Mon, 15 FebDay at Sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Tue, 16 FebOsaka, Japan

Japan’s third-biggest city has thrown off its shackles and stepped out of the shadows to light up the sky with glaring neon signs and a larger than life outlook. Giant octopuses cling to buildings and bustling restaurants pack in the crowds in this great and garish place, which is Japan at its most friendly, extroverted and flavourful. So dive in headfirst to experience an all-out sensory assault of delicious food, shopping cathedrals and glittering temples. Dotombori Bridge bathes in the multicoloured, jewel-like lights of signage-plastered buildings, and the neon lights dance on the canal’s waters below. Osaka is known as the nation’s kitchen, and the Kuromon Ichiba Market has served as the city’s spot to tuck in for almost 200 years. Full of street food stalls – try pufferfish, savoury Okonomiyaki pancakes, or ginger and onion flavoured octopus, among the endless feast of exotic flavours. Osaka Castle is another of the city’s landmarks, built in the 16th century by Toyotomi Hideyoshi. A modern museum now waits inside, where you can learn about the country’s history, and why this castle is a symbol of Japanese unity. Be sure to take the elevator up to the observation deck for a panoramic view of Osaka’s spread. A colourful park encloses the castle and blooms with an ocean of pale pink cherry blossom during the season – the elegant black tiers rising from the pink haze below is one of Osaka’s most alluring visions. Kyoto’s peaceful cultural treasures and temples are also just a short jaunt away on Japan’s sleek trains, should you wish to explore further afield.

Wed, 17 FebOsaka, Japan

Japan’s third-biggest city has thrown off its shackles and stepped out of the shadows to light up the sky with glaring neon signs and a larger than life outlook. Giant octopuses cling to buildings and bustling restaurants pack in the crowds in this great and garish place, which is Japan at its most friendly, extroverted and flavourful. So dive in headfirst to experience an all-out sensory assault of delicious food, shopping cathedrals and glittering temples. Dotombori Bridge bathes in the multicoloured, jewel-like lights of signage-plastered buildings, and the neon lights dance on the canal’s waters below. Osaka is known as the nation’s kitchen, and the Kuromon Ichiba Market has served as the city’s spot to tuck in for almost 200 years. Full of street food stalls – try pufferfish, savoury Okonomiyaki pancakes, or ginger and onion flavoured octopus, among the endless feast of exotic flavours. Osaka Castle is another of the city’s landmarks, built in the 16th century by Toyotomi Hideyoshi. A modern museum now waits inside, where you can learn about the country’s history, and why this castle is a symbol of Japanese unity. Be sure to take the elevator up to the observation deck for a panoramic view of Osaka’s spread. A colourful park encloses the castle and blooms with an ocean of pale pink cherry blossom during the season – the elegant black tiers rising from the pink haze below is one of Osaka’s most alluring visions. Kyoto’s peaceful cultural treasures and temples are also just a short jaunt away on Japan’s sleek trains, should you wish to explore further afield.

Thu, 18 FebBeppu (Kyushu Island), Japan

Beppu is a small city on Kyushu’s east coast. The area is famous for its many hot springs. These hot springs have been the main attraction for decades and can be used for bathing, observing and cooking. West of Beppu is Mount Tsurumi, a volcano that can be accessed walking or using a ropeway. Lookout points will allow sweeping views of Beppu Bay, Beppu itself and the neighbouring city of Oita. More than 2,000 cherry trees near the base of the ropeway make for one of Beppu’s most impressive hanami spots, while in May to June rhododendrons color the mountain.

Fri, 19 FebHiroshima, Japan

History buffs will want to write home Hiroshima. Despite being devastated in 1945, this Japanese city is known to all for its commitment peace – its ruin on the 6th August 1945 led to the end of the war and today, the Peace Memorial (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) , is a constant reminder of the destruction that war brings. A walk in the leafy boulevards of Peace Memorial Park brings quiet contemplation. The Flames of Peace – set in the park’s central feature pond – burn brightly and will continue to do so until all the nuclear bombs I the world have been destroyed. There are many other inspiring messages of hope around the city too; the Children’s’ Peace Monument just north of the park is a homage to little Sadako Sasaki, who was just two in 1945. When she developed leukemia in 1956, she believed that if she folded 1,000 paper cranes – a symbol of longevity and happiness in Japan – she would recover. Sadly she died before she finished her task but her classmates finished the rest. If you are lucky enough to visit during the unpredictable and short-lived Sakura (cherry blossom) season, then the extraordinary sight of the delicate pink blossom floating across the water to the red gate, means you can consider yourself one of the luckiest people on the planet.

Sat, 20 FebFukuoka (Kyushu Island), Japan

Boasting Japan’s heady cocktail of hot springs, gourmet food, abundant nature and spiritual history, Kyushu Island has all the advantages of the mainland, while enjoying its own identity. The island is the third largest of Japan’s five island provinces and prides itself on having everything you could expect from the Land of the Rising Sun. The capital of the island, Fukuoka, is Japan in a bite sized morsel. As one of the country’s most strategic ports – it is closer to Seoul than Tokyo – the city has enjoyed a somewhat prestigious status over the years, including two unsuccessful Mongol invasion attempts in the 13th century. Some scholars suggest that the city is also the first place the Imperial Family set foot, although actual proof of this is scarce. What is certain however is that it was once the home of the samurai, with many samurai related spots found all over the city. A trip to the Kyushu National Museum will allow budding actors to try on traditional costumes and channel their inner feudal lord, while local shrines, tranquil Zen gardens and castle ruins all offer a chance to relive the city’s glory days. The city itself is made up of two smaller towns (Fukuoka and Hakata), and despite unification in 1889, Hakata is still considered the centre. A 2018 survey ranked the city number 22 on “the world’s most liveable cities” list, due to its excellent shopping, outstanding food, excellent transport links, good museums, “feeling of openeness”, green spaces and friendly, safe, environment.

Sun, 21 FebDay at Sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Mon, 22 FebShanghai, China

China’s showpiece city, Shanghai is staggering in its scope and scale. A city of 24 million and growing, Shanghai is a global centre of soaring skyscrapers that is bursting with modernity and energy. The past hasn’t been totally engulfed, however, and leafy colonial streets and delicate temples linger below the skyward scramble. Wealthy and wild, Shanghai is one of China’s most welcoming cities, and you’ll find a hedonistic flair of excess and exuberance below the iconic, jagged Lujiazui skyline. Shanghai’s celebrated waterfront, The Bund, is adorned with grand European style buildings and Art Deco wonders. The glowing orb of the Pearl Tower, meanwhile, rockets above the bending Yangtze River, providing a tall exclamation mark to China’s futuristic vision. Just as the urban spread and claustrophobic towers begin to overwhelm, you can discover the tranquillity of ancient temples and gardens. Then, stumble upon the contorted twist of the Shanghai Tower, a spectacular tube of glass and steel, that dwarfs the city as the world’s second-tallest building. Join Shanghai’s high rollers to drink in swanky bars and restaurants, or bite explosively flavourful street food, below a flood of neon lights. More earthy delights keep the city grounded – head to an open park where locals flow through tai chi routines en masse, or explore rich cultural treasures like the Jade Buddha Temple. A sensory assault, Shanghai is China at its most extreme and intense, yet perhaps most accessible and open-minded.

Tue, 23 FebShanghai, China

China’s showpiece city, Shanghai is staggering in its scope and scale. A city of 24 million and growing, Shanghai is a global centre of soaring skyscrapers that is bursting with modernity and energy. The past hasn’t been totally engulfed, however, and leafy colonial streets and delicate temples linger below the skyward scramble. Wealthy and wild, Shanghai is one of China’s most welcoming cities, and you’ll find a hedonistic flair of excess and exuberance below the iconic, jagged Lujiazui skyline. Shanghai’s celebrated waterfront, The Bund, is adorned with grand European style buildings and Art Deco wonders. The glowing orb of the Pearl Tower, meanwhile, rockets above the bending Yangtze River, providing a tall exclamation mark to China’s futuristic vision. Just as the urban spread and claustrophobic towers begin to overwhelm, you can discover the tranquillity of ancient temples and gardens. Then, stumble upon the contorted twist of the Shanghai Tower, a spectacular tube of glass and steel, that dwarfs the city as the world’s second-tallest building. Join Shanghai’s high rollers to drink in swanky bars and restaurants, or bite explosively flavourful street food, below a flood of neon lights. More earthy delights keep the city grounded – head to an open park where locals flow through tai chi routines en masse, or explore rich cultural treasures like the Jade Buddha Temple. A sensory assault, Shanghai is China at its most extreme and intense, yet perhaps most accessible and open-minded.

Photos